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preoprix:

Alright, enough drawings of OCs for now! Enjoy a mega Sceptile speedpaint!

By the way I’m gonna be starting with Treecko in ORAS, so soon I’ll have this guy. ouo

(via ryuuza)

Source: preoprix
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pelipper:

Nintendo World, NYC 2014 - Pokemon Merch
Source: pelipper
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oosik:

Ammonite: Royal Tyrell Museum, Alberta

Ammonites are extinct hard-shelled, coiled, squid-like marine creatures — abundant during the Mesozoic Era. They were plentiful prey for marine reptiles, like mosasaurs, that inhabited the same waters.

In southern Alberta, some ammonites have a unique form from preservation. Tectonic pressure, heat, and mineralization over spans of millions of years, compress them into colorful, iridescent material used to create jewelry called Ammolite. The ammonites preserved in this manner are both fossils and gemstones, and although fossils are protected under provincial legislation, permission is granted by the Alberta Government to mine the gemstone.

Fragments of ammonites, and occasionally whole specimens, are found in open pit mines. While hoe operators claw carefully through the rock, trained “spotters” watch for any glimmer of the organic treasures.

This specimen, measuring 62 centimeters in diameter, is the most brilliant ammonite ever recovered from Alberta. It was donated to the Royal Tyrrell Museum by the late Rene Martin Vandervelde, chairman of Canada Fossils and Korite International, in 2003.

Source: oosik
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bluekomadori:

Trying to get back into painting :’)

Source: bluekomadori
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earthstory:

Ruby with sapphire core

There are two basic kinds of corundum, basaltic and metamorphic, with the most beautiful stones coming from marble hosted deposits in the Himalayas and its fringes. Localities such as Jegdalek in Afghanistan, Nepal, Mogok and Mong Hsu in Burma and Luc Yen in Vietnam all result from the metamorphosis of Tethyan limestone that were pushed up into mountains and transformed by the pressures accompanying India’s slow motion ongoing collision with Eurasia. 

As gems grow, they tend to do so in fits and starts, depositing new layers on pre-existing seed crystals as and when the conditions are appropriate. In this case it involves the concentration of aluminium from the changing limestone, along with minor trace amounts of the impurities that colour corundum. However conditions may change during one of the pauses in crystal growth, and it is not uncommon to find crystals such as this one from Gamesh Himal in Nepal (2.3 x 1.1 x 1.0 cm), where a blue/purple sapphire core has been overgrown by a later generation of ruby.

Blue sapphire is coloured by a complex electronic interchange between iron and titanium in the crystal structure, while ruby gains its fiery hues from chromium. The type of impurity present in the parent medium changed between the two generations of corundum, creating this unusual visual effect. Such stones are commonly heat treated to remove the blue component, particularly the production from Mong Hsu where nearly all the stones exhibit this phenomenon. I also own a sample like this that I bought in Luc Yen in Vietnam some years ago. 

Loz


Image credit: Joe Budd/Rob Lavinsky/iRocks.com

Source: earthstory
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katieomeara:

This dude was a commission. Currently working on a Xerneas too, and both will be available at conventions as prints. Ye! 

(via kyogres)

Source: katieomeara
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personalchesschirebaconblog:

engagedbbw:

joodleeatsrainbows:

dorkinthefreakkingdom:

kittiecupcakes:

the-lizard-hunter-sociopath:

And my personal favorite:

Popcorn guy is my favorite.

okay seriously in the extended pictures, WHAT THE FUCK IS THE FAMILY COMPLAINING ABOUT WITH THE PIZZA ON THE TABLE? LIKE SERIOUSLY WHAT

I like the last one “Oh my god, I’m on fire? Better jump out a fucking window then.

I’ve said it 100 times, I FUCKING LOVE INFOMERCIAL PEOPLE SO MUCH!!

IM PISSING MY SELF HOLLY SHIT!!!!

(via minimikasaackerman)

Source: the-lizard-hunter-sociopath